Course Descriptions

Accounting Studies Studies

AC300 Accounting I  This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting principles with exposure to basic accounting statements, processes, and management applications.

AC301 Church Accounting II Students learn the importance of setting up proper procedures and internal accounting controls for the local church and para church ministries.

Biblical Studies

BI100 Introduction to the Bible This course traces the history of the Bible and includes discussions of inspiration, the biblical canon, major manuscripts, textual criticism, early translations, and modern versions.

BI200 The Pentateuch In this course, learners study the contents of the Pentateuch and consider the particular problems of evolution and higher criticism in light of present-day archaeology. The course explores such events as the creation, the flood, and the exodus, and it highlights the lives of the patriarchs and Moses. Students will also examine the content, meaning, and applicability of the laws that formed the foundation of Israel’s theocracy.

BI201 Historical Books I This course follows the journey of the people of Israel in Joshua, Judges, and Ruth as they cross the Jordan River, overtake and divide the land of Palestine, and fall into a repeated cycle of sin and repentance. Significant events will be analyzed in their historical and cultural contexts such as the fall of Jericho, the day the sun stood still, and the defeat at Ai. Learners will explore the ministries of judges including Gideon, Jephthah, and Samson, as well as the life and lessons of Ruth. Throughout the course, Davis places emphasis on theological and practical truths gleaned from these books.

BI202 Historical Books II This course answers these and other important questions raised in Israel’s united monarchy as recorded in I and II Samuel and I Kings 1–11. Special emphasis is placed on archaeology, history, and theology. The course also considers parallel passages found in Chronicles and Psalms and focuses on Iron Age discoveries in Palestine as they relate to the biblical text.

BI203 Historical Books III This course covers the history of Israel from the beginning of Solomon’s apostasy (I Kings 11) to the Babylonian captivity (II Kings 25). Learners explore the miraculous ministries of Elijah and Elisha, and survey the rise and fall of kings including Hezekiah, Ahab, Josiah, and Jeroboam. The course concludes by examining Nebuchadnezzar’s destruction of Jerusalem.

BI204 Historical Books IV This course explores God’s relationship with Israel after the exile as recorded in the historical and biblical contexts of the prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. The course begins with a study of the historical and cultural backgrounds of each book and then moves to a detailed exposition of the messages, events, and contents of the postexilic books. The course examines how these messages of God’s faithfulness apply to His people today.

BI205 Poetic Books A study of the Old Testament Books of Poetry, covering Job through the Songs of Solomon. This study covers the background and content of each Book illuminating many key passages and doctrinal themes.

BI206 Old Testament Prophets Between the Testaments A study of the background for the New Testament’s Political and Cultural settings, defining how they impacted the New Testament peoples.

BI207 The Gospels A study of the four Gospels, paying special attention to the style and approach of each writer.

BI208 New Testament Epistles and Revelation This course surveys the New Testament epistles and the book of Revelation, examining both the introductory issues and the basic content of each book. Students will wrestle with significant and challenging passages by exploring the major issues and then interacting with specific passages through inductive Bible study. The goal of the course is to gain an increased commitment to and capacity for applying these portions of God’s Word to the world and Christian living today.

BI300 New Testament Greek I This course will teach students enough Greek so they can go deeper in their Bible Study, but without all the time and memory work required by traditional Greek learning approaches.

BI301 Old Testament Hebrew I This course will teach students enough Hebrew so they can go deeper in their Bible Study, but without all the time and memory work required by traditional Hebrew learning approaches.

BI302 New Testament Greek II A continuation of New Testament Greek I, with emphasis on Greek word studies, and exegetical method called “phrasing”.

BI303 Acts Throughout the course, students examine the difficulties faced in the decades following Pentecost as the church sought to formulate doctrine and send missionaries throughout the Roman Empire. The text’s historical and theological insights as well as spiritual applications for ministry today will be highlighted.

BI304 I Corinthians This class is an exposition of the Book of 1 Corinthians. The studies will be in English, but will also interact with the original language.

BI400 Romans An analytical and exegetical study of Romans, giving attention to the great doctrinal issues of condemnation, justification, sanctification, the place of Israel, and practical Christian living.

BI500 Introduction to the Old Testament The purpose for this course is to help students to be aware of the major issues raised in the careful study of the Old Testament in the modern world. In order to better understand the material in the Old Testament, it is important to know the historical background, context, time period being addressed, authorship, and issues that are considered. For many of these questions, there are different points of view suggested by different scholars. It is important to know why scholars differ and to be able to explain this for our lessons or Bible studies.

BI501 Introduction to the New Testament An introduction to the New Testament that examines major themes, broad divisions, key scriptures, major personalities, and the structure and context of each book. Literary and historical backgrounds are also examined.

BI502 New Testament Greek I  The New Testament Greek is vital for anyone who desires to dig deep into the biblical text, teach it and apply it to the life of the Church. This course introduces the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of biblical Greek, preparing the learner to translate, interpret and apply Scripture. NT Greek I covers Mounce’s Basics of Biblical Greek, chaps. 1-20.

BI503 Old Testament Hebrew I  The Old Testament Hebrew is vital for anyone who desires to dig deep into the biblical text, teach it and apply it to the life of the Church. This course introduces the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, preparing the learner to translate, interpret and apply Scripture. OT Hebrew I covers Pratico and Van Pelt’s Basics of Biblical Hebrew Grammar, chaps. 1-18.

BI504 New Testament Greek II The New Testament Greek is vital for anyone who desires to dig deep into the biblical text, teach it and apply it to the life of the Church. This course introduces the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of biblical Greek, preparing the learner to translate, interpret and apply Scripture. NT Greek II covers Mounce’s Basics of Biblical Greek, chaps. 21-35.

BI505 Old Testament Hebrew II The Old Testament Hebrew is vital for anyone who desires to dig deep into the biblical text, teach it and apply it to the life of the Church. This course introduces the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, preparing the learner to translate, interpret and apply Scripture. OT Hebrew II covers Pratico and Van Pelt’s Basics of Biblical Hebrew Grammar, chaps. 19-36.

BI510 Old Testament Exegesis I In this course, we will (1) continue to study Biblical Hebrew morphology, grammar, and syntax; (2) continue to acquire new Hebrew vocabulary; and (3) learn how to use Hebrew to study the Old Testament – the science of Hebrew exegesis! Prerequisites: Hebrew 1 and Hebrew 2.

BI511 New Testament Exegesis I The goal of this course is for students to develop a working knowledge of the methods for exegesis of the NT writings and the use of these methods in reading the books of the NT. Students will study the procedures of interpretation and practice applying them to NT materials. We will examine the methods of exegesis and illustrate the application of these methods to various kinds of New Testament writings. Along the way students will apply the methods to a selected passage of Scripture, first in an isolated/independent fashion and, then, in an integrated way. The goal of the course is for students to be able to apply the relevant methods of interpretation to any NT text and to prepare an exegesis paper on the passage.

BI520 Old Testament Exegesis II The primary objective of the course is to train students to observe and interpret Hebrew narrative in order to teach and preach effectively. Exegetical methodology will be introduced and practiced using various texts in Exodus. The outcome of this objective will be realized through required readings and the exegesis paper.

BI521 New Testament Exegesis II This course is a continuation of NT Exegesis I.
The goal of this course is for students to develop a working knowledge of the methods for exegesis of the NT writings and the use of these methods in reading the books of the NT. Students will study the procedures of interpretation and practice applying them to NT materials. We will examine the methods of exegesis and illustrate the application of these methods to various kinds of New Testament writings. Along the way students will apply the methods to a selected passage of Scripture, first in an isolated/independent fashion and, then, in an integrated way. The goal of the course is for students to be able to apply the relevant methods of interpretation to any NT text and to prepare an exegesis paper on the passage.

BI522 Romans In this course, students explore the rich truths of justification and other significant topics by completing an exegetical and theological study of Paul’s epistle to the Romans in the Greek text. The course treats select historical, grammatical, structural, and lexical data that illumine the meaning of this important New Testament epistle. Students will be encouraged to put textual theory into living practice. The course assumes students’ ability to make grammatical and text-critical evaluations and to engage in Greek exegesis and Greek word studies.

BI550 The Book of Isaiah Few Old Testament books are as theologically rich and literarily compelling as Isaiah. Students discover those dynamics as they complete an exegetical study of the book of Isaiah. In addition to surveying the contents of the book, the course develops the understanding and skills of exegetical exposition. In the process, students examine key chapters in Isaiah, such as the promise of Immanuel, the message of hope, and the “Suffering Servant.” The course demonstrates how a proper theology of the Messiah is integral to successful Christian life and ministry.

BI551 The The Gospel of Mark Perhaps the greatest need in the Christian community today is for biblical leadership. However, there are different views on leadership issues, such as: What are the responsibilities of ministerial leaders? Who is qualified for pastoral leadership? Can women serve as pastors? This course identifies biblical answers to crucial leadership questions from Paul’s letters to Timothy and Titus. Stott walks students through an exegetical analysis of these letters and shares insights from the historical background and the Greek New Testament. Throughout the course, learners are guided in applying the theology of the pastoral epistles to life and ministry.

BI552 The The Gospel of Luke At the heart of Luke’s gospel are questions about God’s plan, His Messiah, and the emerging new community of Gentile Christians. This course highlights these and other significant theological themes found in the gospel of Luke. Learners complete a textual examination of the gospel of Luke and its message by working through the book of Luke a chapter at a time. One of the course’s goals is to show how Jesus’ life, teaching, death, and resurrection actually reflect divine events “fulfilled among us” (Luke 1:1). Finally, the course enables students to prepare this narrative material for teaching in ministry contexts.

BI553 The Acts of the Apostles The book of Acts is the intended sequel to the gospel of Luke, showing how the new community of faith applied Christ’s teachings to life and how they proclaimed His message throughout the world. In this course, students complete an exegetical study of the book of Acts by focusing on the biblical theology of the book, the historical background of events, and the theological emphasis of the speeches. The goal of the course is to enable learners to articulate the message of Acts in ways that are both textually accurate and contemporaneously relevant.

BI554 Old Testament Theology I In order to understand and apply any passage of Scripture faithfully, one must begin with the foundational concepts and theology that precede and inform it. Averbeck introduces the content and theology of the books of Genesis through Kings, identifying the foundational themes that emerge and tracing them through the rest of the Bible. In this way, he shows how the theology of the Old Testament is basic and essential for understanding Jesus Christ, the church, and the Christian life.

BI555 Old Testament Theology III n order to understand and apply any passage of Scripture faithfully, one must begin with the foundational concepts and theology that precede and inform it. In biblical theology, the foundation is developed in the Latter Prophets and Writings (Job–Malachi). The history, poetry, wisdom, and prophecy of these books are essential for fully grasping the meaning and message of Jesus’ teaching and the mission of the church today. Averbeck introduces the content and theology of the Writings and Latter Prophets, working through the books section-by-section, focusing on major passages and their theological connections throughout all of Scripture.

BI600 The Pastoral Epistles Perhaps the greatest need in the Christian community today is for biblical leadership. However, there are different views on leadership issues, such as: What are the responsibilities of ministerial leaders? Who is qualified for pastoral leadership? Can women serve as pastors? This course identifies biblical answers to crucial leadership questions from Paul’s letters to Timothy and Titus. Throughout the course, learners are guided in applying the theology of the pastoral epistles to life and ministry.

BI610 Old Testament Theology This course examines how Old Testament theology is pivotal to the universal goal of redemptive history: the rule of God and the establishment of God’s kingdom in all the earth. The course tracks salvation history as it appears in nearly every book of the Old Testament, and it shows the vital relationship of the Old Testament to the New Testament. Throughout the course, the doctrines of kingdom and salvation are applied to the Christian life.

BI611 New Testament Theology The goals of the course are for the student to become acquainted with the following: (1) some of the important literature in the field, especially with respect to the various approaches to doing a theology of the New Testament; (2) relationship of biblical interpretation to a method of doing biblical theology; (3) the theological relationship of the Old Testament to the New Testament; (4) the integral relationship of New Testament theology to the ideas of the kingdom, inaugurated eschatology, and the new creation.

Church History Studies

CH300 Church History Church history is the heart of His story, God’s kingdom work on earth. This course explores the development of the Christian church from Pentecost to the present day.

CH570 Church History to the Reformation Nearly every major doctrine of the church was established before the Reformation. In this course, learners discover how the Church’s doctrine, faith, and practice developed from Pentecost to the time of the Protestant Reformation.

CH571 Church History Since the Reformation Since the Reformation, the church has experienced countless changes and advancements. In this course, learners survey the development of the Christian church’s doctrine, faith, and practice from the Protestant Reformation to the present.

CH572 The Ancient Church We are indebted to the church fathers for the lasting influence of their lives and their works. This course covers the history of the ancient church (Pentecost to AD 500) and the men and writings of that era.

CH573 Reformation Church History The Reformation changed the world spiritually, socially, and even politically. In this course, learners trace the historic development of the Protestant Reformation from its 16th century background to its impact on the world and church today.

CH574 The History of Christianity in America “It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.” So said George Washington, reflecting early America’s regard for divine providence. This course examines the church in America from its continental beginnings to the current day, emphasizing the influences that have forged the contemporary religious scene. Starting with the nature of Christianity in British colonies prior to the Revolution, the course traces the development of Christianity throughout its tumultuous history in America, including the effects of the Civil War and the Great Awakenings. The goal of the course is to see the workings of God throughout American history and to gain insight into the state of Christendom today.

General Studies

GS100 College Writing Basic Composition teaches students writing skills necessary for college success, with a primary focus on grammar and composition. Among the many other writing-centered activities we’ll engage in, this class requires students to practice brainstorming, free-writing, sentence construction (in the context of short writing assignments), paragraph construction, the organization of ideas, and the several types of, purposes of, and audiences for general essays. Students will build on these basic skills by planning, writing, and revising essays, and experiencing writing and reading as a multi-step process. As an added bonus, students will also learn the process and value of peer-to-peer editing.

GS101 Globalization How do you make sense of people when they argue that they are ‘pro-‘ or ‘anti-globalization’? Why are financial crises, environmental crises, and health crises also now increasingly experienced as global crises? How are goods, capital and people moving around the world in new ways? How do these movements change politics locally and globally? How do they relate to national security and national sovereignty? And more importantly, how to these movements relate to the Gospel mandate?
This course aims to help you start answering these sorts of questions by examining globalization in all its diverse forms of world-wide interconnection.

GS200 English Grammar to master Biblical Greek If you think that . . . • Aorist is a major artery of the heart • Clause is the surname of the fat guy in the red suit • Syntax is Uncle Sam’s slice of alcohol and tobacco sales . . . then you need English Grammar to master New Testament Greek.
This course is designed to help students get a quick brush-up on the English grammar they’ve either forgotten or never quite learned, in a way that ties directly to their first-year Greek studies.

GS201 English Grammar to master Biblical Hebrew One of the biggest problems students encounter learning biblical languages, especially Hebrew, is that they have either forgotten or simply do not know their English grammar. Concepts such as verb tense and voice, relative pronouns, antecedents, adjectival substantives, and the like, sound like familiar terms, but may seem foreign when it’s time to put them to practice.
This course enables students of biblical Hebrew to grasp the basic concepts of English grammar that are needed in order to be able to transfer these concepts to biblical Hebrew.

GS203 Introduction to Critical Thinking This course provides students with the skills necessary for analyzing and critiquing the messages and arguments presented by the world around us in a variety of media. Emphasis is placed on the construction of reasoned, defensible responses to specified instances of discourse. Reflective thinking in which the student identifies the weaknesses of one’s own arguments is also addressed.

GS500 Guide to Research Writing This course teaches the basic research and writing skills that are necessary for clear and accurate written communication. The goal is to prepare graduate and undergraduate students for research projects and thesis requirements in academic environments.

GS501 Introduction to sociology This course surveys the principles of social structure, social institutions, social processes, and social change, and gives special attention to religious institutions to help the student understand and relate Christianity to a secular society.

GS501 Introduction to Psychology This course examines historic and contemporary psychological theories of maturity, motivation, personality, emotions, and mental health. Theories are understood, evaluated, and where appropriate integrated with biblical teachings about human nature and the Christian life.

Internet Studies

IS340 Understanding computers In this course we demystify computers and the Internet, along with their jargon, so that students understand not only what they can do with each but also how it all works and why. Students leave this course armed with a new vocabulary and equipped for further exploration of computers and the Internet. Topics include hardware, software, the Internet, multimedia, security, website development, programming, and dotcoms. This course is designed both for those with little, if any, computer experience and for those who use a computer every day.

IS341 Internet technologies for ministry This course surveys the history of how technology has been used in the church with a particular focus on practical applications of Internet technologies for ministry.

IS342 Internet Programming This course teaches you the basics of HTML5 including the latest in CSS styling. We discuss basic syntax and move forward to more advanced features such as JavaScript with animations, CSS3 and media queries, and styling with some of the new HTML5 tags.

IS343 Building and maintaining a Church Website This course is an introduction to web design and development within an overview of current web environments. Projects will cover planning and implementation of ministry websites that offer common functionality as well as adhere to good usability, accessibility, compatibility, and validation practices. HTML, XHTML, CSS, interactivity, information architecture and navigational structures will be explored, as well as usability and web design strategies.

IS344 Online Education and discipleship This course explores the theory and practice of integrating eLearning into adult learning environments and addresses the many factors that need to be considered in the design and delivery of eLearning. eLearning offers a great deal of promise to both adult educators and learners, yet eLearning must be implemented appropriately; its use integrated into well established and well-researched pedagogical practices in order to be effective.

Ministry Studies

MS100 Praying With Power This course aims at inspiring students; giving them the courage to pray for the impossible and helping them find the persistence to see their prayers to completion

MS101 Public Speaking This course is an introduction to speech communication which emphasizes the practical skill of public speaking, including techniques to lessen speaker anxiety, and the use of visual aids to enhance speaker presentations.

MS200 Starting and Leading a Small Group Small groups have the power to change lives. They’re the ideal route to discipleship a place where the rubber of biblical truth meets the road of human relations. Students will receive practical guidance on how to start and lead effective small groups.

MS201 Principles of Bible Teaching. This class examines principles of adult learning and methods of Bible teaching that enhance the teacher’s toolbox. Students practice using creative classroom methods in an actual teaching experience.

MS300 Biblical Preaching The principles and practice of crafting and delivering a biblical sermon will be outlined and demonstrated.

MS352 Church Administration and Leadership A course designed to develop leadership potential in students and to give them a familiarity with the various elements of the administrative process, including: goal setting and achieving, organization, delegation, human relations, group dynamics, supervision and the training of other leaders. Though the principles are universal, the focus of the course is the local church.

MS353 Information Technology and Church Administration This course will introduce students to various technological church management tools.

MS400 Organizing the local church for discipleship Practical theological foundation for the practice of evangelism-discipleship leadership in the church. Includes content and communication of the gospel within cultural context at home and abroad. Preparation in class, followed by community experience. Prayer is primary throughout.

MS401 Foundations of Christian Leadership From Moses to the Lord Jesus, to the Apostles, the Bible is a great text on leadership. Basic principles of leadership and practical insights will be covered from a biblical perspective.

MS402 Christian Worship This course is a Study of the Principles and Practice of Biblical Worship.

MS500 Christ centered Preaching This course emphasizes Christ-centered preaching. We will first concentrate on key components of expository messages and, then focus on how to make sure such sermons remain true to the redemptive message of all Scripture by considering Biblical Theology principles as they apply to various texts and genres of Scripture.

MS502 Church Administration and Leadership A course designed to develop leadership potential in students and to give them a familiarity with the various elements of the administrative process, including: goal setting and achieving, organization, delegation, human relations, group dynamics, supervision and the training of other leaders. Though the principles are universal, the focus of the course is the local church.

MS560 Christian Worship and spiritual renewal Philosophical study of the role of music in worship. Theological implications, style of music, qualifications for worship leadership, and the spiritual dynamics of worship are explored. MS570 Globalization and the Great Commission

This course considers in detail the key drivers of globalization, its contemporary shape, and its implications for world mission.

MS600 Evangelism and discipleship in the local church This course is a study of evangelism and discipleship with special attention paid to the context of a local church setting.

MS601 Survey of pastoral ministry This course examines the roles, function, and theological considerations for the practice of pastoral ministry. Ministry identity, call, and foundational pastoral tasks will be discussed.

Theological Studies

TH101 Christian Doctrine I An introduction to Christian Doctrine, starting with Bibliology and Basic.

TH200 Christian Doctrine II A continuation of Christian Doctrine I, studying Angelology, Demonology, Anthropology and Christology.

TH210 Messianic Prophecy TH300 Christian Doctrine III A study of Ecclesiology, Eschatology, Hamartiology and Soteriology.

TH310 Evidences of Biblical Christianity TH400 Christian Doctrine IV A study of Pneumatology and Divine Healing

TH500 Foundations of Christian Doctrine This course covers the essentials of all major areas of systematic theology with the goal of orienting students to the basic material necessary to understand and study God’s Word.

TH550 Systematic Theology I This course is a study of Revelation and theological method. Topics include natural and special revelation, Word, inspiration, inerrancy, authority, and the methodology of theology

TH551 Systematic Theology II This course deals with what is called theology proper, the study of God himself. There is no higher labor, no more delightful occupation than this. Topics include the existence, knowability, and attributes of God, and the trinity.

TH552 Systematic Theology III This course is the study of man, sin, and salvation. Topics include God’s foreknowledge and election, man’s free will, atonement, conversion, and more.

TH553 Systematic Theology IV This course is designed to cover the important doctrines dealing with the church—its character, make-up, officers, duties, and sacraments—and with the last days, including what is called personal eschatology (what happens at death and beyond) and general eschatology (what will transpire at the end of this age).

TH600 Approaches Christian Apologetics “Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have” (I Peter 3:15). Peter’s words ring true in today’s world. In this course, learners compare biblical, historical, and recent approaches to defending faith in God, Christ, and Scripture. The course emphasizes the apologetics of Peter among Jews in Jerusalem (Acts 2), and Paul among the Gentiles in Athens (Acts 17). It compares the influential approaches of Augustine and Aquinas, but focuses primarily on the approaches of six apologists who led in the resurgence of evangelicalism during the last half of the 20th century.

TH650 Contemporary Theology I The course begins with a review of the major developments in Western thought prior to Hegel, and then explores the theologies of Hegel, Kierkegaard, Barth, Bultmann, and Tillich. The course culminates in the “Death of God” theologies of Paul Van Buren and Thomas Altizer. The course enables learners to evaluate contemporary, non-evangelical theologies and to recognize their impact on everyday life.

TH651 Contemporary Theology II The course focuses on the theologies that were prevalent in the 1960’s, including Theology of Hope, Liberation Theology, Feminist Theology, Process Theology, New Age Theology, and four forms of Post-modern Theology. Students are encouraged to draw from the course content so as to relate and communicate better to their post-modern world.

Research-Based Doctor of Ministry Courses

DM790 GUIDE TO RESEARCH WRITING(6) An introduction to English research writing style. At the end of the course the student will know the difference between academic writing, and other types of writings. The student will demonstrate compency in Research Writing by preparing an annotated bibliography of no less than 20 peer reviewed articles published in the last five years in their area of interest.

DM800 INTRODUCTION TO DOCTOR OF MINISTRY RESEARCH (6) At the end of this course, the student will have a better appreciation of academic research, and knowlwdge of the research process, from problem or topic selection, to research design, to completed research report. The student will demonstrate competency by prparing a proposal for thier Doctor of ministry project.

DM808 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT I (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter I of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM809 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT II (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter II of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM810 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT III (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter III of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM811 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT IV (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter IV of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM812 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT V (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter V of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

Doctor of Ministry Courses

DM790 GUIDE TO RESEARCH WRITING(6) An introduction to English research writing style. At the end of the course the student will know the difference between academic writing, and other types of writings. The student will demonstrate compency in Research Writing by preparing an annotated bibliography of no less than 20 peer reviewed articles published in the last five years in their area of interest.

DM800 INTRODUCTION TO DOCTOR OF MINISTRY RESEARCH (6) A course preparing students to conduct upper-level graduate research and to write effectively. This course gives the proper foundation for writing the D. Min. project.

DM801 ADVANCED OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY (6)  This course gives special attention to developing the skills and methods of Old Testament theology for the study of scripture and equips the student to successfully complete the biblical-theological component of the DMIn Project. The course also explores the role of biblical-theological reflection in leadership, ministry development and preaching.

DM802 ADVANCED NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY (6) This course gives special attention to developing the skills and methods of New Testament theology for the study of scripture and equips the student to successfully complete the biblical-theological component of the DMIn Project. The course also explores the role of biblical-theological reflection in leadership, ministry development and preaching.

DM803 ADVANCED PRACTICAL THEOLOGY (6) Pastroral ministry in the 21st Century. Developing into a leader worth following is considered in the context of self-leadership, other-leadership and Christian spirituality. A critical appraisal of pastoral leadership models is presented as the student develops a synthetic model of Christian leadership considered from the perspective of the Word, the church, and the world. DM804 DISCIPLESHIP AND SPIRITUALITY (6) A study of the nature, theology, purpose, and practice of biblical discipleship and spirituality. This seminar will engage the life-giving resources of discipleship and spiritual formation, the seasons and stages of the maturing spiritual journey, ministries of guiding others in groups and individuals on the spiritual path with spiritual disciplines, and the implementation of Christian formation for the local church and other ministries. Attention is given to understanding contemporary issues in discipleship and spirituality and evaluating popular trends and practices.

DM805 ADVANCED CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP (6) This course covers leadership of the contemporary church or ministry with special consideration given to the integration of biblical values, contemporary leadership theory, contemporary organizational theory and the participant’s context of ministry.

DM806 ADVANCED MISSIONS AND CHURCH PLANTING (6) Fresh perspectives in church planting are bringing together what God is doing around the world into the North America context. Missional Church planters now see themselves as cross-cultural missionaries increasing the importance of missiological and contextual issues into local ministries.

DM807 CHURCH GROWTH AND REVITALIZATION (6) A study of church growth and renewal dynamics from a biblical, theological, historical, and cultural perspective. Topics include church growth and renewal principles, typologies, and methodologies, with attention to the roles of prayer, worship, preaching, teaching, fellowship, and evangelism in church growth and renewal.

DM790 GUIDE TO RESEARCH WRITING(6) An introduction to English research writing style. At the end of the course the student will know the difference between academic writing, and other types of writings. The student will demonstrate compency in Research Writing by preparing an annotated bibliography of no less than 20 peer reviewed articles published in the last five years in their area of interest.

DM800 INTRODUCTION TO DOCTOR OF MINISTRY RESEARCH (6) At the end of this course, the student will have a better appreciation of academic research, and knowlwdge of the research process, from problem or topic selection, to research design, to completed research report. The student will demonstrate competency by prparing a proposal for thier Doctor of ministry project.

DM808 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT I (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter I of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM809 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT II (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter II of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM810 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT III (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter III of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM811 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT IV (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter IV of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

DM812 DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROJECT V (6) Building on skills acquired in DM790 and DM800, the student is expected to complete chapter V of their Doctor of Ministry dissertation.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) – Missiology Courses